Mobile Devices

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Mobile Devices

  • First steps for securing mobile device access: iPhone, iPad, Android etc

    Smartphones are fantastic. I can respond to emails from clients, suppliers and partners wherever I am. Using apps like Drive, Dropbox etc we can share important information. But what if I lose that phone - how do I stop people using it, getting access to client information, or otherwise harming my business?

  • Human integration with technology and systems.

    Connecting all the time

    Andrés Lucero of Aalto University, Helsinki, Finland recently published ( arXiv:1804.04833 [cs.HC] ) his autoethnography about his period of times in his life that he has voluntarily lived without a mobile phone. Since 1999 he spent two separate periods (2002-2008 and 2014-2017) without a phone. Both related to when he was working in academia and cycling to work. Interesting points to note were that even during these periods he had access to wifi enabled tablets, but the need for authentication codes and secure communications were the key areas that were affected by not having a mobile phone. Additionally in Finland at the age of 7 children receive their first mobile phone and house keys so that they can travel to school on their own.

    With two factor authentication heavily reliant on mobile phones either for SMS/text codes or smart phone apps with authentication code production, it becomes more and more difficult to imagine the operation of today’s work environment without a phone. In one situation the service he was trying to use reluctantly ended up emailing the security details to an email address that they weren’t able to verify.

    Moving back in to the connected world and embracing all forms of device, including wearable, Andrés Lucero also had to learn how to cope with synchronous and asynchronous forms of communication such as Whatsapp, where in a group things are said and discussed through the night which aren’t for people sleeping to respond to until they want to.

    The paper makes for an interesting study, and demonstrates a number of situations where normal life is eased by the power of live connection. Eg. location and travelling directions, location based entertainment and two factor authentication services. The paper also shows how remaining in control of technology can help maintain control of stressors.

    For security all businesses should be using two factor authentication where they can, and with smart phones being one of the most popular methods the need for all employees having access becomes apparent. However there are alternatives, if you’d like to discuss please contact us below.

    #telanovaReporter

  • Laptop encryption, why you need it

    Do you lock the doors of your house when you are not in?  I hope the majority answer to this question is "yes of course I do, this isn't Canada you know!" This leads me to my next question. Are your organisation laptops encrypted? The answer to this question should be the same as the first but I bet it isn't. 

    No I don't think you all are spies before you ask, but I do think you should all be at least aware of why laptop encryption is a necessity for EVERY organisation and not just the ones that send their payslips to employees titled agent. 

    Let me quickly explain what encryption is and why you need it.

  • Now's the time to upgrade your wireless infrastructure

    If your business is relying on older wireless infrastructure it is probably time to upgrade. Wireless traffic is only going up, not only is the demand from each device going up, each person typically has more devices - laptop, phone and tablet etc!

    On top of that, nearby wireless access points, bluetooth and other wireless peripherals all compete with you for the limited amount of wireless bandwidth.

    Enter "5GHz". The "5GHz" band has a lot less devices competing. Typically 5GHz has a smaller range than 2.4GHz, which counter to what you would expect is actually a benefit. It means there are fewer devices competing within an access point’s reach.

    Any laptops, phones and tablets replaced within the last few years probably already support the latest wireless protocol 802.11ac which uses the 5GHz band, why not update your wireless infrastructure to support them? Wireless 802.11ac infrastructure is also now quite reasonably priced.

    telanova will guide you through the whole process: defining your requirements, choosing a vendor, creating a secure design, implementation, and post installation support. Contact telanova on 01344 989 530 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to get started.

  • Our helpdesk received a call from Mr. S. Claus...

    Our helpdesk received a call from Mr. S. Claus, who wanted some help with his important deadline coming up.

    His business was manufacturing/direct delivery - all year long he stays at his headquarters, in the Arctic, but once a year he travels all over the world, delivering to his clients.  His old email service, provided by his ISP, was straining under the volume of email from clients (mostly children) with what they wanted in this year.  He needed to change to reliable email system, able to cope with the huge number of emails  and he wanted to change quickly.

  • PCs and laptops are too complex and troublesome

    For most people, PCs and laptops are too complex, too troublesome and too expensive, especially now you can offload so much to the cloud. Why waste time on antivirus, backup, drivers, service packs, upgrades etc? I've been keeping my eye on Chromebooks since they were launched a couple of years ago. Four weeks ago a new Chromebook came out, the Samsung series 3, and I just had to buy one. I love it: it starts up in just 8 seconds, it's as light as a feather, silent, runs six hours on battery, all for just £200+VAT.

  • Scan documents with the Google Drive Android app

  • Wifi for staff and visitors

    Customers and staff expect access to wifi at your premises, for very good reasons. If you simply give them the wireless code for your network, you'll expose your servers to attack from devices you don't control. You may have confidence in your guests' integrity, that they wouldn't deliberately hack into your servers, but malware could be running on their devices without their knowledge. So how can you provide guest wifi whilst also protecting your network?

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